Kowloon 九龍

Kowloon (/kˈln/Chinese九龍Cantonese YaleGáulùhng) is an urban area in Hong Kong comprising the Kowloon Peninsula and New Kowloon. It is bordered by the Lei Yue Mun strait to the east, Mei Foo Sun Chuen and Stonecutter’s Island to the west, a mountain range, including Tate’s Cairn and Lion Rock to the north, and Victoria Harbour to the south. With a population of 2,019,533 (2 million) and a population density of 43,033/km2 in 2006, it is the most populous urban area in Hong Kong. The peninsula’s area is approximately 47 km2 (18 sq mi).

Kowloon Night View 九龍夜景

Kowloon Night View 九龍夜景

The name Kowloon stems from the term Nine Dragons, alluding to eight mountains and a Chinese emperor: Kowloon PeakTung ShanTate’s CairnTemple HillUnicorn RidgeLion RockBeacon HillCrow’s Nest and Emperor Bing of Song.[1] The part of Kowloon south of Boundary Street, together with Stonecutters Island, was ceded by Qing China to the United Kingdom under the Convention of Peking of 1860. For many years the area remained largely undeveloped, used by the British mainly for tiger-hunting expeditions.[2] The part of Kowloon north of Boundary Street (New Kowloon) was leased by the British as part of the New Territories under the 1898 Second Convention of Peking for 99 years. Within New Kowloon is Kowloon City, an area of Hong Kong where the Kowloon Walled City used to be located. The Kowloon Walled City itself was demolished in 1993. The same area was called Guanfuchang (官富場) during the Song dynasty (960–1279). “New Kowloon” has remained part of the New Territories.